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The Society of Homeopaths

The Society of Homeopaths is a professional body whose members are trained to high standards and agree to practise according to a strict code of ethics and practice.

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avr logoWELCOME TO

The Society of Homeopaths

The Society of Homeopaths is a professional body whose members are trained to high standards and agree to practise according to a strict code of ethics and practice.

Find Out More

avr logoWELCOME TO

The Society of Homeopaths

The Society of Homeopaths is a professional body whose members are trained to high standards and agree to practise according to a strict code of ethics and practice.

Find Out More

The controversial use of animals in homeopathy research has come to the fore in the past year and the Society's board of directors are giving members an opportunity to thoroughly debate the issue, before finalising the organisations policy in June 2016.

In autumn 2015 we launched a debate to provide members with background information from people from all sides of the topic regarding the use of data from animal research in the field of homeopathy. 

Our current research policy does not condone or advocate the harming of animals used in research into homeopathic medicine. On very rare occasions where necessary, we currently reserve the right to use, discuss and disseminate animal based research in communications and general work in such a way that respects the sensitivity of our membership on this issue.  Our policy is in line with European regulations which state that wherever possible, a scientifically satisfactory method of testing strategy not entailing the use of live animals shall be used.

For further information, to view the research policy undergoing consultation and join the debate   Click here 

 

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  • Please be reassured that the comments from the news story in August 2015 will all be moved to this area shortly. None of the comments will be lost. We are currently working with our web developer to make this happen. Further information and a background article summarising the various forums available around this debate may be viewed at http://www.homeopathy-soh.org/about-the-society/animal-research-the-debate

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  • Please note that all of the submitted comments from the August news story around this topic have now been moved to this area. Apologies for the delay caused while the technical team progressed this.

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  • Debate: a formal discussion on a particular matter in a public meeting or legislative assembly, in which opposing arguments are put forward and which usually ends with a vote.

    How are you getting on with finding the opposing arguments??

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  • This may be obvious to anyone wishing to read all the comments previously made in this debate, but you need to press 'Load Previous Comments' more than once to see them all.

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  • I do not think that there is a place for animal testing in homeopathy. I remember walking out of a lecture at a Society conference some years ago when the presenter outlined the animal experimentation in the research. Delny Britton has made the case against animal testing cogently and I was glad to hear her present on this at the HRI conference in Barcelona.
    The EU is committed to seeing animal testing in medical research phased out and the 2015 Directive states:
    The new rules firmly anchor in EU legislation the “Three Rs the requirement to
    Replace,
    Reduce
    and
    Refine the use of animals wherever possible. This means that animal studies should be either
    replaced by methods not involving animals, or adapted to reduce the number of animals needed, or refined so as to minimise pain, suffering or distress experienced by the animal, or to increase their welfare. If an alternative approach to achieve a research objective is available, the Directive makes its
    use mandatory."The Commission's response to the Citizens' Initiative "Stop Vivisection" has been adopted.
    It would be such a great opportunity if homeopathy could lead the way by banning animal testing in homeopathy research. Until then, "Not in my name" please!

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  • Animal testing is not the way forward for proving homeopathy works. It moves away from our humane principles - one of the main reasons why people choose to be treated homeopathically.
    I can see why there is a debate, though. I am doing the MSc in Integrated Healthcare (Homeopathy) at UCLan, and a major part of that is learning to research and to read research to see whether it is valid or not. In focussing on my own practice I searched for papers on homeopathy and addiction, and found only 4 paper on the treatment of alcoholism with homeopathy (all were positive). Two papers where pilot trials in humans, which show only that further research is worthwhile, and two were in animal studies - in rats and frogs. As I stand firmly against animal testing, I did not cite this research, positive as it is, in my assignment.
    If we have such a paucity of research in alcoholism and in other areas of health, however, and 50% of what we have is research on animal models, I can see the temptation to use this research, to cite it, to encourage it. After all, surely these little animals are giving their lives for the greater good - acceptance of homeopathy amongst the mainstream. This actually is irrelevant. Proper. open minded scientists who can distinguish between good research and bad can see that homeopathy has been proved to work above placebo in human studies. Detractors will disregard any research, whether based on animals or humans, that does not fit with their mindset. It's not about the results, but the politics.
    Let us not forget that not only does testing on animals harm the individual animals, it also goes deeply against Hahnemann's teachings, it goes against nature, it goes against the trust that our clients have in us to provide an alternative to mainstream medical fascism, and it goes against our own confidence to present homeopathy to the world in the way homeopaths want to present it.
    I have been quiet on this matter while I weighed up the pros and cons, especially after consulting with highly respected colleagues and my tutors. I can't get over the fact that animals suffer, and karmically this is anti-healing. anti-universal health.
    I believe there is no place in homeopathy for animal testing and I urge Society members to demand the board change its policy on animal testing as soon as possible, as a matter of high urgency.

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  • I've come in a bit late here, and I'd like to echo what everyone has said about not supporting any research that harms animals. I think every member would feel the same. The current policy reflects this view clearly. It seems the issue in question is regarding the publication of such research and references to it. This doesn't seem quite so straightforward to me, because if articles are not published which refer to it , how would we know it is going on? Until Delny's article was widely circulated, I had no idea such practices were happening. Her article raised our awareness - and our outrage. If we are unable to publish such articles, we would be less informed, and it worries me that we might enter into a situation where we are censoring and suppressing information. Similarly, I would be concerned about severing associations with organisations like the HRI for the same reasons, so I'd welcome any further discussion.

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  • As I had a phone call, I didn't quite finish my previous comment! Apart from the concern I mentioned about possibly closing down a flow of information, I am not in favour of references to animal research being used on our website or in our leaflets as evidence for the effectiveness of homeopathy. It seems to me there is little debate to be had here, just some more open discussion around the details and implications of information availability.

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  • My previous views on animal research, quoted in the Homeopath and mentioned by Mark at the AGM, have now changed.
    I was convinced by my group discussion at the conference that animal research as previosusy done is not relevant as the experiments don't use homeopathy in an individualised way. Therefore any results are not applicable to homeopathic practice. I think the SoH needs to state this, explaining why we don't have any links to such studies.
    Veterinary research on animals which are already ill is a completely different thing. More like treatment during epidemics perhaps.

    from Leeds, West Yorkshire, UK
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  • In zoology there is a lot of student who research on animals and according to this they know what kind of different animals have different nature like their routine, food, species and other things related to them.
    Academic Writers UK

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