What happens when you see a Homeopath

Homeopath clinicWhen you see a homeopath it’s their job to get a thorough understanding of your health and the exact symptoms you are experiencing, so that they can find a homeopathic remedy which matches you and your symptoms as closely as possible.

During this confidential, in-depth ‘case-taking’ process your homeopath will want to know precise details of your current illness, but will also consider other aspects of your health including your past medical history, diet, lifestyle and personality.

Holistic

Homeopathy is a holistic medicine and as such takes into account all aspects of the individual and their symptoms before making a prescription. This first consultation will usually take between one and two hours, depending on the practitioner. You will be asked many questions and some of them will seem strange for those not used to homeopathy. The practitioner is building up a picture of your unique make up, a bit like putting together a jigsaw puzzle.

Follow-ups

The first follow up consultation will usually be around four weeks after the first prescription, although in some cases it may be sooner. The session may be shorter, and the homeopath will ask about changes that have occurred, using their detailed notes as a reference point, before deciding on the next step in your treatment.

The number of consultations an individual may need is difficult to predict – it depends on a number of factors such as the age of the patient, how long the symptoms have been going on and their individual response to the prescription.

What about seeing my doctor?

It is recommended that you maintain your relationship with your GP or specialist. When necessary homeopathic and conventional approaches can be used alongside one another to give the most appropriate medical care. Your local NHS services will also be able to arrange any diagnostic procedures you may need and provide emergency cover.

Some people choose homeopathy because they are unhappy with side effects from their current conventional medication. However you should continue with any conventional medical treatment that may have already been prescribed as it can be dangerous to stop this suddenly. Any change in use of conventional medication should be discussed with both the prescribing doctor and your homeopath as treatment progresses.

If at any stage of your treatment you are concerned about changes in your symptoms, you should contact your homeopath and/or medical practitioner immediately.

click here to watch a short youtube video clip on what it is like to see a homeopath recorded by David Mundy RSHom.

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